Category Archives: science communication of some kind…

Watching mammoths go extinct

A new study of mammoths has discovered startling amounts of mutations accumulated in the DNA of a small population isolated on Wrangel Island off Siberia. This research has important ramifications for current critically endangered species. It is an unusually long … Continue reading

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A new solution to acid mine drainage

If your tap water looked like this, would you drink it? No? Then you may be surprised to hear that water like this exists in many places across Australia. The reason the water looks so unhealthy is because it has … Continue reading

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Don’t have a cow, man: Ditching dairy, beef and lamb aids in global transition to sustainability

Time to put down your meat pie and double caramel mocha decaf frappuccino – unless you ordered it on soy. New research out of Chalmers university in Sweden suggests giving up beef and dairy will allow the energy system to … Continue reading

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How CRISPR-Cas9 Could Cure Cancer

Cancer, a plague on humanity. Chances are you’ve seen someone close to you taken by this horrific disease. Now, there may just be a way to cure it. The Costs of Cancer In 2014, Cancer killed more than 44,000 people in … Continue reading

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Hey Fish! Urine Trouble!

Some people might yell, a dog might growl, maybe a deer will clash antlers, but how does the fish (cichlid Neolamprologus pulcher) show aggression? It pees. That’s right, twinkle, urinate, take a leak, wizz, whatever you would like to call … Continue reading

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A recipe for old leaves

Just how valuable are your garden scraps? Every year, nearly half of our organic waste gets thrown to landfill, when all of it could be used for other things.  Local councils are slowly introducing collection schemes for people’s leaves, grass … Continue reading

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Look out Harry – invisibility cloaks don’t work on Tassie devils anymore

Or at least, not on six very important Tasmanian devils. A study published in Biology Letters last October studied 52 wild devils, and found six who possessed never-before-seen antibodies against the deadly devil facial tumour disease, or DFTD for short. … Continue reading

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The Universe, Ripping us a New One

As scary as it seems, we might be learning more about how our universe will end… In a combined study, Astrophysicists from across America and Australia have recently reduced the uncertainty of the Hubble Constant from 3.3% to 2.4%. This … Continue reading

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Eye of the Storm: Climate Change and the Reef

The Great Barrier Reef is dying. One of Australia’s most spectacular natural wonders is being devastated by the impact of climate change. Scientists, governments and the media have drawn attention to human induced mass coral bleaching and ocean acidification but … Continue reading

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Altering viral genes for safer, higher efficacy immunisation

Immunisation remains a globally cost-effective method for reducing disability, disease and death. But researchers face the constant challenge of increasing both vaccine safety and efficacy. A challenge also seen in parental hesitancy towards child immunisation. New research has found a way to combat … Continue reading

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